Gene signature might identify patients at risk of CAR T-associated neurotoxicity

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Attendees at ASCO 2018 Annual Meeting
Photo by © ASCO/Zach Boyden-Holmes 2018
A specific gene signature might be able to identify patients at risk of CD19 CAR T-cell associated neurotoxicity, according to results of an exploratory analysis presented at the 2018 Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The analysis, based on... [Read Article]
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Efficacy of KTE-C19 CAR T cells not compromised by prior blinatumomab

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McCormick Place during 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting
Photo by © ASCO/Rodney White 2018
Prior exposure to blinatumomab does not appear to affect the successful manufacture of KTE-C19 or its efficacy in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The clinical benefit of KTE-C19, an anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, was preserved regardless of... [Read Article]
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Dasatinib outcomes similar to imatinib in pediatric Ph+ ALL

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Child with leukemia
Photo by Bill Branson
Dasatinib used during induction and consolidation in the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) AALL0622 trial provided early response rates for children with Ph-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to investigators. But the early response rates did not improve event-free survival (EFS) compared to the use of consolidation... [Read Article]
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VF incidence increases significantly in kids after ALL treatment

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Lumbar vertebrae (shown in red)
Credit: Anatomography
A 6-year prospective study from the Canadian STOPP investigators revealed that following treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), approximately 1 out of 3 children experiences vertebral fractures (VF) and 1 out of 5 children shows non-VF. Glucocorticoid use and vertebral fractures at diagnosis emerged as significant... [Read Article]
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Early infection could prevent ALL, doc says

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Smiling baby
Photo by Petr Kratochvil
Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may be preventable, according to a researcher. Mel Greaves, PhD, of The Institute of Cancer Research in London, UK, has reviewed more than 30 years of research and concluded that ALL develops in 2 steps—genetic mutation before birth and further genetic change... [Read Article]
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Regimen can improve DFS in newly diagnosed T-ALL

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Vials of drugs
Photo by Bill Branson
The addition of nelarabine can improve treatment outcomes for certain patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), according to a phase 3 trial. Patients with newly diagnosed, intermediate- or high-risk T-ALL had a significant improvement in 4-year disease-free survival (DFS) if they received nelarabine in addition to chemotherapy... [Read Article]
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Cooperation can drive T-ALL, study shows

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Micrograph showing T-ALL
© Hind Medyouf, German
Cancer Research Center
Overexpression of HOXA9 and activated JAK/STAT signaling cooperate to drive the development of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), according to researchers. The team found that JAK3 mutations are significantly associated with elevated HOXA9 expression in T-ALL, and co-expression of HOXA9 and JAK3 mutations prompt... [Read Article]
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Drug receives orphan designation for ALL

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Micrograph showing ALL
The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted orphan drug designation to LBS-007 as a treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). LBS-007 is a non-ATP cell-cycle inhibitor targeting a range of cancers. LBS-007 functions by blocking the kinase activity of CDC7, a key regulator of the cancer cell cycle. Inhibiting CDC7... [Read Article]
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Art education benefits blood cancer patients

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Doctor and patient
Photo courtesy of CDC
New research suggests a bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) can reduce pain and anxiety in inpatients with hematologic malignancies, including those undergoing transplant. The BVAI involved an educator teaching patients art technique one-on-one for approximately 30 minutes. After a single session, patients had significant improvements in... [Read Article]
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