New guidelines for idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease

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David C. Fajgenbaum, MD
Photo from Penn Medicine
The anti-IL-6 antibody siltuximab is central to first-line treatment of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD), according to new guidelines on iMCD published in Blood. The guidelines also say that early intervention with combination chemotherapy may prevent a fatal outcome in patients with severe iMCD. To create... [Read Article]
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ASCO addresses financial barriers to cancer clinical trials

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Preparing drug for a trial
Photo by Esther Dyson
The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has issued a policy statement addressing financial barriers to patient participation in cancer clinical trials. ASCO’s policy statement outlines a series of recommendations designed to address multiple financial barriers that impede access to clinical trials, including patient costs that... [Read Article]
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Physician burnout linked to patient safety

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Doctor with tablet
Photo by George Hodan
Physician burnout may jeopardize patient care, according to research published in JAMA Internal Medicine. A review and meta-analysis suggested that physician burnout was associated with a higher risk of patient safety incidents, reduced patient satisfaction, and low professionalism. Burnout was defined as “a response to prolonged exposure... [Read Article]
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New guidelines on antimicrobial prophylaxis

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Cancer patient
receiving treatment
Photo by Rhoda Baer
Experts have published updated guidelines on antimicrobial prophylaxis for adults with cancer-related immunosuppression. The guidelines include antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral prophylaxis recommendations, along with additional precautions, such as hand hygiene, that may reduce infection risk. The guidelines were developed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)... [Read Article]
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Humans may have more HSCs than we thought

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HSCs in the bone marrow
Humans may have ten times more hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) than previously thought, according to research published in Nature. Researchers developed a new approach for studying HSCs and found evidence suggesting that HSC numbers increase rapidly through childhood, reach a plateau by adolescence, and remain relatively constant throughout adulthood. “We... [Read Article]
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Study links communication, outcomes in cancer

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Doctor consults with cancer
patient and her father
Photo by Rhoda Baer
Better communication between cancer patients and healthcare providers may provide tangible benefits, according to research published in JNCCN. Cancer survivors who reported greater satisfaction in communicating with healthcare providers had better general health and mental health, fewer doctor visits, and reduced healthcare spending,... [Read Article]
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Protein ‘atlas’ could aid study, treatment of diseases

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Blood samples
Photo by Graham Colm
New technology has enabled researchers to create a “genomic atlas of the human plasma proteome,” according to an article published in Nature. The researchers identified nearly 2000 genetic associations with close to 1500 proteins, and they believe these discoveries will improve our understanding of diseases and aid drug development.... [Read Article]
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FA pathway key to DNA repair after CRISPR cutting

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DNA repair
Image by Tom Ellenberger
New research suggests the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway plays a key role in repairing double-strand breaks (DSBs) created by CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing. Researchers said they found that Cas9-induced single-strand template repair requires the FA pathway, and the protein FANCD2 localizes to Cas9-induced DSBs. The team said this research provides... [Read Article]
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Fitness trackers help monitor cancer patients

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Fitness trackers
Photo from Cedars-Sinai
A small study suggests fitness trackers can be used to assess the quality of life and daily functioning of cancer patients during treatment. Results indicated that objective data collected from these wearable activity monitors can supplement current assessments of health status and physical function. This is important because current assessments... [Read Article]
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